The Lunar Chronicles Stores – Part 2

Title: Carswell’s Guide to Being Lucky (The Lunar Chronicles #2.5); After Sunshine Passes By; The Princess and the Guard; Something Old Something New

Author: Marissa Meyer

Publisher: Felwel andFriends 2016

Genre: YA Scifi

Pages: 39; 21; 61; 56

Rating: 5/5 stars

Reading Challenges: Fairytale Retelling

The enchantment continues. . . .
The universe of the Lunar Chronicles holds stories – and secrets – that are wondrous, vicious, and romantic. How did Cinder first arrive in New Beijing? How did the brooding soldier Wolf transform from young man to killer? When did Princess Winter and the palace guard Jacin realize their destinies?
With six stories – two of which have never before been published – and an exclusive never-before-seen excerpt from Marissa Meyer’s novel, Heartless, about the Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland, Stars Above is essential for fans of the bestselling and beloved Lunar Chronicles.

“Carswell’s Guide to Being Lucky” — A cute little story featuring Thorne’s childhood. I loved reading about the expansion of a story Cress learned in her research.

“After Sunshine Passes By” — More insight into the history of the various characters. This time we get to learn more about Cress and her childhood. Sibyl Mira is as scary as ever in this story…

“The Princess and the Guard” — My favorite story of the entire book. I loved learning more about the relationship between Winter and Jacin. The story shows us the depth of their relationship and sheds some light onto where their character’s are at when we meet Jacin aboard Sibyl Mira’s ships. A great short story!

“Something Old Something New” — A nice epilogue story for the series. It was great seeing all the main characters again. Plus we get some development in their stories. My only disappointment was not enough Winter and Jacin in this story. They were my favorites!

The Lunar Chronicles

Winter by Marissa Meyer

Title: Winter (The Lunar Chronicles #4)

Author: Marissa Meyer

Publisher: Feiwel andFriends 2015

Genre: YA Scifi

Pages: 827

Rating: 5/5 stars

Reading Challenges: Fairytale Retelling; I Love Libraries

Princess Winter is admired by the Lunar people for her grace and kindness, and despite the scars that mar her face, her beauty is said to be even more breathtaking than that of her stepmother, Queen Levana.

Winter despises her stepmother, and knows Levana won’t approve of her feelings for her childhood friend–the handsome palace guard, Jacin. But Winter isn’t as weak as Levana believes her to be and she’s been undermining her stepmother’s wishes for years. Together with the cyborg mechanic, Cinder, and her allies, Winter might even have the power to launch a revolution and win a war that’s been raging for far too long.

A fitting conclusion to The Lunar Chronicles. While I really enjoyed the previous books, this one really caught my attention. I was drawn into the story on page one. Winter is hands down my favorite character of the entire series. I loved the chapters that were from her point of view. The other chapters were good, but Winter stole the show. I was on pins and needles waiting to see if Winter survived and if she and Jacin finally got together. I was riveted by the build up to the confrontation between CInder and Levana. Oh my it was so stressful! But it was such a great ending. While the last chapter was a bit rushed, I still really really enjoyed it.

The Lunar Chronicles

Fairest by Marissa Meyer

Title: Fairest (The Lunar Chronicles #3.5)

Author: Marissa Meyer

Publisher: Feiwel andFriends 2015

Genre: YA Scifi

Pages: 220

Rating: 4/5 stars

Reading Challenges: Fairytale Retelling; I Love Libraries

Pure evil has a name, hides behind a mask of deceit, and uses her “glamour” to gain power. But who is Queen Levana? Long before she crossed paths with Cinder, Scarlet, and Cress in The Lunar Chronicles, Levana lived a very different story—a story that has never been told . . . until now. New York Times –bestselling author Marissa Meyer reveals the story behind her fascinating villain in Fairest, an unforgettable tale about love and war, deceit and death. This extraordinary book includes a special full-color image of Levana’s castle and an excerpt from Winter, the exciting conclusion to The Lunar Chronicles.

 

In a sense, I didn’t like this book. Levana is such a horrible person that of course I didn’t want to have any sympathy for her. And I don’t have any sympathy for her even after reading her story. She has always been a cruel person manipulating people to cover her own insecurities. On the other hand, I did enjoy getting more story featuring the characters we know now including Jacin, Winter, and Selene. Overall, a very interesting story…

The Lunar Chronicles

The Lunar Chronicles Stories – Part 1

518glH0BM0LTitle: Glitches (The Lunar Chronicles #0.5); The Little Android (The Lunar Chornicles #0.6); The Queen’s Army (The Lunar Chronicles #1.5)

Author: Marissa Meyer

Publisher: Felwel andFriends 2012

Genre: YA Scifi

Pages: 31; 35; 47

Rating: 5/5 stars

Reading Challenges: Popsugar – Romance set in the future; Fairytale Retelling; 52 Books – W49

The enchantment continues. . . .
The universe of the Lunar Chronicles holds stories – and secrets – that are wondrous, vicious, and romantic. How did Cinder first arrive in New Beijing? How did the brooding soldier Wolf transform from young man to killer? When did Princess Winter and the palace guard Jacin realize their destinies?
With six stories – two of which have never before been published – and an exclusive never-before-seen excerpt from Marissa Meyer’s novel, Heartless, about the Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland, Stars Above is essential for fans of the bestselling and beloved Lunar Chronicles.

After reading Cinder, I decided to pick up Stars Above so I could read the short stories that take place before the first book or right after. “Glitches” was a fun little introduction to Cinder and her life before the events of the first book. We get to find out how she arrived in New Beijing and met her new family. It also drops some great hints are to who she really is. “The Queen’s Army” gave us a glimpse into the creation of Levana’s Lunar army. Very interested to see more of the Lunar side. And finally, “The Little Android” was a great retelling of The Little Mermaid. Now I can move on to reading Scarlet.

The Lunar Chronicles

  • #0.5 Glitches
  • #0.6 The Little Android
  • #1 Cinder
  • #1.5 The Queen’s Army
  • #2 Scarlet
  • #2.5 Carswell’s Guide to Being Lucky
  • #3 Cress
  • #3.5 Fairest
  • #3.6 Stars Above
  • #4 Winter

popsugarfairytale retelling52 books 2014 blog widget for side bar

Signature

Witches edited by Paula Guran

witches3c2-682x1024Title: Witches: Wicked, Wild, and Wonderful

Edited by: Paula Guran

Publisher: Prime Books 2012

Genre: Short Stories; Paranormal

Pages: 375

Rating: 3/5 stars

Reading Challenges: Fairytale Challenge

Surrounded by the aura of magic, witches have captured our imagination for millennia and fascinate us now more than ever. No longer confined to the image of a hexing old crone, witches can be kindly healers and protectors, tough modern urban heroines, holders of forbidden knowledge, sweetly domestic spellcasters, darkly domineering, sexy enchantresses, ancient sorceresses, modern Wiccans, empowered or persecuted, possessors of supernatural abilities that can be used for good or evil — or perhaps only perceived as such. Welcome to the world of witchery in many guises: wicked, wild, and wonderful!

Overall, a very hit and miss collection of stories. I really enjoyed a few such as “Walpurgis Afternoon” and “Basement Magic.” But my favorite was definitely Neil Gaiman’s story featuring Bod and the graveyard. The retooling of Rapunzel was also very intriguing. Unfortunately, many of the stories were dull.

Fairy Tale

Signature

 

The Complete Hans Christian Anderson Fairy Tales

Title: Complete Fairy Tales

Author: Hans Christian Anderson

Genre: Short stories; fairy tales

Pages: 1504

Rating: 3/5 stars

Reading Challenges: T4MC — Short Stories; Genre — Short Stories; Ebook; 52 Books — Week 9

How I Got It: iPad download

Reared in poverty, Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen created more than 200 folk and fairy tales beloved by countless generations of children — and adults.

Overall I am very disappointed in this story collection.  I adore the Grimm fairy tales and thought this would be similar.  I was mistaken.  These are morality tales cloaked in sometimes a fanciful nature (I know the Grimm stories are too, but they hide it better).  They are overtly Christian in their subject matter and tone.  I just didn’t enjoy these stories.  I find my mind wandering while reading.  I couldn’t kept on track.  It’s taken me almost three weeks to get through this volume a bit at a time.  I made it, but I won’t be revisiting this volume any time in the future.  I’ll stick with my Grimm tales.

T4MC Part 11Genre VarietyEbook52 books

Signature

 

Flower Fables by Louisa May Alcott

Title: Flower Fables

Author: Louisa May Alcott

Genre: Classic fairy tales

Pages: 140

Rating:    2 / 5 stars

Reading Challenges: Telling Tales; Mount TBR; Fall into Reading

How I Got It: I own it!

Flower Fables is a treasury of six different stories penned by Louisa May Alcott. These old-fashioned fairy tales have been compiled and edited by Daniel Shealy, who has done editing on several Alcott books. The text is very readable, and has magic flavor added via the font’s joining together of several letters. Today’s children, like many children of the past, will enjoy meeting Alcott’s fairies, sentient flowers, and other real and imagined characters. Illustrator Leah Palmer Preiss has filled the book with delightful and interesting fairies and other creatures. The illustrations are bright and full. Readers may want to watch for the bonuses of quotations and tiny portraits of those who influenced Louisa May Alcott. This book would make a good bedtime storybook, and like many tales of old, has good morals that children could take away with them perhaps without even realizing there was a lesson involved. The afterword is also interesting as it shares interesting details about Miss Alcott. For example, she wrote these tales when she was 16. Another bonus at the end of the book is the biographies that go along with the quotations and miniature portraits. — FromIndependent Publisher –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Bored.  That’s my initial thought after reading this volume.  I’m bored.  These tales just aren’t interesting or exciting to me.  I don’t want to read anymore.  And I love old fairy tale stories.  These just lacked any oomph.  That’s all.  Boring.